Volume 55; 2002-2003 • Issue 3

Contents hide
2 Articles

Editor’s Note

Articles

TELEVISION AND THE PUBLIC INTEREST
by Newton N. Minow

REVISITING THE VAST WASTELAND
by Newton N Minow and Fred H Cate

THE ROLE OF THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION ON THE PATH FROM THE VAST WASTELAND TO THE FERTILE PLAIN
by Kathleen Q. Abernathy

PROMOTING INNOVATION TO PREVENT THE INTERNET FROM BECOMING A WASTELAND
by Zoë Baird

MINOW’S VIEWERS: UNDERSTANDING THE RESPONSE TO THE “VAST WASTELAND” ADDRESS
by James L. Baughman

THE “VAST WASTELAND” SPEECH REVISITED
by Jonathan Blake

MINOW AND THE “WASTELAND”: TIME, MANNER, AND PLACE
by Daniel Brenner

THE “VAST WASTELAND” REVISITED: HEADED FOR MORE OF THE SAME?
by Michael Copps

AVAST YE WASTELAND: REFLECTIONS ON AMERICA’S MOST FAMOUS EXERCISE IN “PUBLIC INTEREST” PIRACY
by Robert Corn-Revere

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO LOCAL NEWS?: THE “VAST WASTELAND” RECONSIDERED
by Geoffrey Cowan

FROM VAST WASTELAND TO ELECTRONIC GARDEN: RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE NEW VIDEO ENVIRONMENT
by Charles M. Firestone

TV: A VAST OASIS OF PUBLIC INTEREST PROGRAMMING
by Edward O. Fritts

PROMOTING THE PUBLIC INTEREST IN THE DIGITAL ERA
by Henry Geller

FORTY YEARS OF WANDERING IN THE WASTELAND
by Nicholas Johnson

COMING OF AGE IN MINNESOTA
by Jane E. Kirtley

GOOD NEWS FOR GOOD NEWS: EXCELLENT TELEVISION JOURNALISM BENEFITS NETWORKS AND OUR SOCIETY
by Robert Leger

ELECTRONIC OASES TAKE ROOT IN MR. MINOW’S VAST WASTELAND
by Edward J. Markey

FAMILY-FRIENDLY PROGRAMMING: PROVIDING MORE TOOLS FOR PARENTS
by Kevin J. Martin

A DIVERSITY OF VOICES IN A “VAST WASTELAND”
by Condace L. Pressley

HOW DO WE MAKE GOODNESS ATTRACTIVE?
by Fred Rogers

THE “VAST WASTELAND” IN RETROSPECT
by Joel Rosenbloom

I WANT MY C-SPAN
by Bruce W. Sanford

MANHATTAN
by Cass R. Sunstein

MEASURING QUALITY TELEVISION
by Russ Taylor

SCREEN-AGERS…AND THE DECLINE OF THE “WASTELAND”
by Elizabeth Thoman

“DO YOU BELIEVE IN MIRACLES?”
by Richard E. Wiley

Book Review

PUBLIC TELEVISION LAW RÉDUIT
by Herbert A. Terry

A review of The Public Television Legal Survival Guide, 2nd ed., Association of Public Television Stations, 2001. According to its preface, the book is intended for “station personnel who do not have legal training” but who need to know some of the basics for their daily work and, through footnotes, to assist “in-house station counsel and outside legal consultants.” For the most part, this book fulfills that promise. Privately published by the Association of Public Television Stations (APTS) in Washington, D.C. and overseen by Andrew D. Cotlar, their Senior Staff Attorney, The Public Television Legal Survival Guide quite effectively organizes and summarizes most federal law-statutory and regulatory-that is unique to public television.